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Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

  • 1.  Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 09-01-2017 11:31 AM

    Happy New Year all,

    This is a question that often comes up among professional materials writers and I'd be curious to get the input of teachers who may not work as writers.

    Writers often face the problem of sharing materials for free, which benefits our fellow teachers, versus trying to sell materials or request pay for our hard work in creating those materials.

    For example, there are a number of websites out there that allow teachers to upload materials and share materials for free, or sometimes for website "credit". As wonderful as these sites are for teachers, they treat creating materials as something teachers would do anyway or a valueless byproduct of teacher work. You don't see websites that ask you to upload a video of yourself teaching for free. It seems like we should expect to pay for quality materials, whether it be from a published book, a book or website published by the teacher themselves, or a site like Teachers Pay Teachers.

    However, I also realize that teachers don't always get the materials they need from their schools and that teacher salaries are low. It's hard to expect teachers to pay for quality materials all the time.  So how can we balance a teacher's need for free or very cheap materials with a teacher/materials creator's need to make a living?

    Just food for thought in the new year.

    Best,

    Walton

    ------------------------------
    Walton Burns
    Materials Writer
    ------------------------------


  • 2.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 10-01-2017 01:31 AM

    Hi Walton,

    Great discussion topic. Let me give you my two cents here.

    I teach at the Uni level in China currently and I have collaborated with other teachers to develop different approaches to classes, and subsequently developed materials for them. I have no problem working with them to develop materials for them to use in their classes, and I do not mind sharing the materials afterwards with people who ask for them. If it can be of help to them and their students, then so be it.

    However, I drawn the line at demands or orders (as in imperatives). Case in point, I had developed materials for a more comprehensive approach to the Oral English classes at The University of Science and Technology Beijing. The Foreign Teacher Coordinator did not appreciate my efforts, seeing it as interference with other teachers, so I finished the materials for the first semester of the Freshmen and Sophomore Oral English classes, and left the second term incomplete. We had a new teacher, and at the end of the first semester, he asked me where the materials for the next semester were. I explained that the Foreign Teacher Coordinator wanted him to do it instead of me because she didn't want me interfering. His response was that I could do it, and that he would like the materials as soon as possible to review them. I will not repeat what I said to him as this is a family website.

    For me, one of my biggest issues is how fast learning transitions, and while I would love to write materials, I cannot imagine writing coursebooks that will still be relevant for EFL instruction (at least in places where we need coursebooks and materials); in most cases where schools provide basic teaching materials, it is usually ESL materials anyway, which aren't very helpful in an EFL environment in my opinion (this is not to say that a good teacher cannot make them relevant, but rather that a relevant text will take some pressure off a teacher and engage the students more).

    At the same time, generic materials are just that - generic, which means they may have to be tweaked or adjusted depending on the target student(s), so it is challenging for me to write and charge people for a text that they may get 1 or 2 terms out of, or that they will have to modify constantly for their courses.

    I do understand charging for materials - it is a lot of work (to do a single custom coursework for my Oral English classes takes me about 100 hours of work, and I will do four of these to cover four classes over two terms - that's 10 weeks of full-time hours) and people should be compensated for their efforts. Maybe what we need is a sort of iTunes store for materials - that is, most of the money goes to the artist/writer instead of the publisher?

    Anyway, these are my (rambling) thoughts. Looking forward to what other people will say.

    Cheers,
    Rob

    ------------------------------
    Robin Dahling
    University of International Relations - Beijing, PRC
    China



  • 3.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 10-01-2017 11:42 AM

    A very difficult issue to solve. I have been teaching for more than forty years and I hope I can give you a possible answer but maybe not a solution.

    The first problem is the one-man band concept in language teaching. Teachers do almost everything. Institutions expect you to prepare extensive material for students, assess its suitability, be the model for speech and pronunciation, develop activities, develop exams, quizzes and addtional exercises, find additional resources, and much more.

    This makes most teachers desperate for materials, especially, with due respect to book writers and developers, because many texts are incomplete or have no relation to real language. So teachers search for free material to somehow lessen the load.

    With regard to getting paid, you have to look at it from the previous viewpoint but I agree that it is difficult to find a way to get paid for developing quality materials. With the development of the internet, there is online publishing, which some people prefer to publishing companies, or you can develop a website for selling your material. However, there is still one problem that pops up in low-income countries: copying materials.

    I know that there are countries that don´t have strict copyright laws and people can walk into a copy store and get the whole book. That´s a difficult situation you have to consider since it means a loss of income after all your hard work.

    I hope there will be other opinions about this since this is an important issue.

    Sergio Lozano

    ------------------------------
    Sergio Lozano
    Scientific Publications Coordinator
    Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon
    Mexico



  • 4.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 10-01-2017 02:34 PM

    Walton - you raise some good questions.  For those teachers/writers with an online presence and desire to sell online products and resources, there is pressure to give something away.  Email marketing experts stress the importance of the "freebie"  to encourage people to opt in and then get on a mailing list.  With so much free content out there, perhaps the tendency is that people feel that they have to give more and more content away.  I don't mind sharing a checklist or handout however I think that giving too much away suggests that our content is not valuable. I personally am giving less and less away for free these days.  I look forward to other comments.  

    ------------------------------
    Patrice Palmer, M. Ed., M.A., TESL
    Canada



  • 5.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 10-01-2017 03:06 PM

    Hi - just thought I'd jump in with my two cents.

    Yes, sharing materials is a topic our teachers address all the time.  Really it depends on the course type and the program set-up.  In our case, we have two distinctly different programs that address this differently: a 10-week academic ESL program and a wide variety of short-term programs that fall under the heading of Custom ESL Programs.  The teachers in the 10-week program have access to folders in our database that hold materials for each course level created by past teachers.  Teachers can pull from those materials or develop their own.  We encourage teachers to put materials they have created into these folders so that others can use them for that same course in the future.  Sharing materials is not required, but highly encouraged.  Of course, in general teachers would prefer to teach the same course over again so that they can continue to use the materials they've already created themselves, but when that doesn't happen they are able to see what was used in the past by another teacher.  On the other hand, our Custom Programs are so varied that keeping materials specific to any one short-term program would not be very useful.  In these programs, teachers need to develop their own materials for each program.  However, if it's a program that we will likely need to reuse the materials in the future, we do pay that teacher more for their curriculum development time and we collect the materials and keep them on file to be used in the future no matter who is teaching the next time.  

    In my experience, teachers find it can be difficult to use another teacher's materials unless they are very general.  Using a handout sharing site like printables.com (share a handout and get credit towards another one) or keeping materials on file to share for courses that are particular to one program seem the best ways to share.  I believe that as a program coordinator, schools can support their teachers by keeping materials that are valuable to their setting on file and available to their teachers.

    Thanks!

    Suzanne

    ------------------------------
    Suzanne Mitri
    Custom Programs Coordinator
    University of Hawaii Outreach College



  • 6.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 17-01-2017 08:50 AM
    Interesting topic.  As a consumer, I always prefer free, who doesn't?  When resources are shared freely on the internet, they are easy to access, view, and download.  I can then use it, modify it, or not use it at all depending on the needs of my students.  I hate when I've purchased a resource only to find it wasn't that useful.  But if something is particularly well done, can add value to my teaching, can save me time and is not something that I could just easily create on my own then it earns my dollars.  I think teachers generally use a mixed bag of materials we create, purchase, and acquire for free. 
    The main reason I replied to this thread though is to address a sub-topic of this free vs paid issue: when and where is it appropriate to advertise or announce your materials for sale?  If you have your own website, podcast, or facebook page and you announce your materials for sale, that would be appropriate.  A site like teacherspayteachers would be appropriate because I expect to find materials for sale there.  However, when I'm part of a teacher discussion thread where teachers have been freely sharing ideas and resources and then in pops a teacher with a link to his/her materials for sale, I find that inappropriate.  What do you think?

    ------------------------------
    Margaret Flores
    M.S. Ed.
    ------------------------------



  • 7.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 17-01-2017 11:11 AM
    I see sharing materials, whether free or paid for, a form of collaboration, which is very important in our profession.  Seeing what others are doing helps to get my brain kickstarted in the creative direction and I hope when I share my ideas it does the same for others.  As life long learners we benefit from freebies and from paying to gain knowledge...both are great!!

    ------------------------------
    [Lisa] [Porter] [MBA, TESOL Cert.] [ESL Instructor] [Gwinnett Technical College] [USA]
    ------------------------------



  • 8.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 26-01-2017 08:30 AM
    Hey,
    I, too, have looked at this from both sides. As someone who is working on a textbook now, obviously I see the importance of paying for materials.  However, i have made materials and put them online for anyone to use.  I have used similar sites for myself. 
    I have rarely paid for anything because there is so much that is free out there.  I also understand that this is something which the creator deserves to profit from, which is why I don't mind ads for schools, products, etc on those sites.

    Like was said elsewhere, we are in a community that likes to share and help its members, which is why it is always good when we can give back to each other in this way.

    ------------------------------
    Chris Chris

    ------------------------------



  • 9.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 11-01-2017 07:47 AM

    I understand this as a teacher and an author of a textbook. The notion of "freebies" as a means of enticement is logical. This is why I use a free online podcast site to host audio recordings that correspond with the textbook. There are some tracks one could use without the textbook for free, but much of it requires it. So, people do get "freebies," but in order to get the whole experience, having the book is essential. I invite all to see for yourself what I am talking about. I Want To Learn English

    Podbean remove preview
    I Want To Learn English
    This site hosts audio lessons that complement the textbook
    View this on Podbean >

    Hope this gives you some ideas.

    Regards,

    ------------------------------
    Jose Torres
    Baltimore City Community College



  • 10.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 11-01-2017 06:32 AM

    Sharing materials is a matter of choice and professional courtesy .  Some also use it as a sort of currency to build their reputation for excellence among peers.  When your position demands that you create your own materials , you do so on the employer's time, and you are under contract , I think that your creations belong to your employer .   If you develop products on your own time and don't use them during your paid workday,  you can get the proper legal protection  (copyright ) and sell on the  open market .   

    ------------------------------
    Lydia Edwards
    Teacher
    VIPKID



  • 11.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 12-01-2017 10:30 AM
    I understand the argument that giving materials away for free undermines the value of materials writers' work. Nor I begrudge my colleagues the money they have received for their work, which has helped me teach hundreds of classes more wisely. Yet, the argument that materials must always be paid for comes from a perspective of scarcity. What kind of a world would it be if creative, exciting materials were freely available to all teachers everywhere? What incredible things the human race could accomplish! "We don't live in that kind of a world," is the reply. The reason we don't live in that world is because we do not make it that way. Making it "that way," of course, is no easy task, but if something I create can improve someone else's teaching, I would hate for that improvement to be lost simply because the teacher couldn't afford to pay for it.

    ------------------------------
    Sheryl Slocum
    ESL Coordinator
    Alverno College
    ------------------------------



  • 12.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 15-01-2017 09:04 PM
    Yes, but....
    Yes, I think sharing materials is a great way for teachers to learn and grow collaboratively. But, I think it can go too far in the wrong direction. For PreK-12 teachers and college faculty, using someone else's materials may mean you are not taking the time to develop your own thinking about learning objectives and the individual needs of the students YOU have. I find that I develop materials that are comfortable for me based on my particular knowledge base, the stories I tell and the research I know. Just handing the activity sheet to another instructor does not carry with it all that background knowledge I call upon when doing the activity.  On the other hand, yes, sharing is a great way for district teachers to make best use of their time. If they plan together, then each one creates one story box or activity kit they can all borrow, they can create a district teacher's library. But, NO! Websites like Pinterest show thousands of activities that are mostly of poor quality and only a few wonderful things mixed in, so encouraging new teachers to go that route is a dangerous trend.  When I'm doing teacher training, I ask teachers this:  if a truck pulled up to your school with a year's supply of free junk food and candy, would you cancel your lunch contract and serve junk to your students every day just because it's free? 


    ------------------------------
    Karen Nemeth
    Lead Consultant
    Language Castle LLC
    ------------------------------



  • 13.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 15-01-2017 09:04 PM
    Dear all

    I fully endorse the points made by Sheryl and agree that the materials should be shared with others free.  While agreeing with all she has said, I like to support her from an Indian perspective, and here it is.

    I consider myself lucky if I am able to produce materials.  If I cease to share these materials and use them all by myself, the materials will eventually die.  They are not propagated.  On the other hand, when I share them with others, my materials get a chance to be trialed several times, and with each trial, they may become better.  Further, by reaching a large number of students and teachers, the materials not only get richer, but also leave a mark of the creator.  In fact, there is better returns one gets by sharing than selling.

    In India we consider all knowledge as god given.  knowledge is not a tangible commodity that can be sold.  It is too precious to allow us to fix a price tag on it.  This being the case can we sell it?

    It is with this belief, that education in India is cheapest.  At several levels (including doctoral level) the education offered in India is free though not to all the recipients.  Sharing knowledge is considered to be a sacred duty of those who possess knowledge.  This is evident from the fact, that most of the materials produced in India in earlier days did not carry any copyright. Even today, sharing is quite liberal, and with the onset of IPR (Intellectual Property Rights) and plagiarism being a crime, certain modifications are being brought in into our educational system. 

    Besides these, teachers in many parts of the world are not well paid in comparison with their counterparts in management and industry. This being the case, should we tax the poor teacher by asking him/her to buy materials?

    These are my personal views, and once again I warmly endorse the views put forth by Sheryl and wish her tribe increases.  I quote her text in full for reference.

    Mohanraj


    I understand the argument that giving materials away for free undermines the value of materials writers' work. Nor I begrudge my colleagues the money they have received for their work, which has helped me teach hundreds of classes more wisely. Yet, the argument that materials must always be paid for comes from a perspective of scarcity. What kind of a world would it be if creative, exciting materials were freely available to all teachers everywhere? What incredible things the human race could accomplish! "We don't live in that kind of a world," is the reply. The reason we don't live in that world is because we do not make it that way. Making it "that way," of course, is no easy task, but if something I create can improve someone else's teaching, I would hate for that improvement to be lost simply because the teacher couldn't afford to pay for it.

    ------------------------------
    Sheryl Slocum
    ESL Coordinator
    Alverno College

    ------------------------------
    Sathuvalli Mohanraj
    India
    ------------------------------



  • 14.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 15-01-2017 09:04 PM
    Hello all,

    Examining boards and [publishers are often very good places to go for free resources. An example are the 'best practice' TESOL video clips currently being put on YouTube By Trinity College and the Trinity TESOL bi-monthly newsletter which reviews a selection of free material every other month.

    If anyone has any suggestions of further resources Trinity TESOL can provide, feel free to contact me directly at ben.beaumont@trinitycollege.com.

    ------------------------------
    Ben Beaumont Trinity College London United Kingdom
    ------------------------------



  • 15.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 15-01-2017 09:05 PM
    I recently left an ESL job and left behind two binders full of worksheets and material I had created for my classes that went with the books. Part of me didn't want to leave the material because I was disappointed with how I had been treated the last semester and didn't want to do anything beneficial for the school. However, I love my students and wanted them to progress and learn. I knew that my material made a huge difference in class and so I printed and filed everything for the new teacher. I want the students to be able to benefit and also for the teacher to have an easier transition into the position. I wish I would have been paid but ultimately I made the materials and worksheets for the students and I don't expect compensation from them, just progress.

    ------------------------------
    Chanda Li
    VIPKID
    ------------------------------



  • 16.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 21-01-2017 08:55 PM

    Wow! This discussion went in so many different directions I didn't anticipate and hadn't thought about.

    I was thinking mainly of creating materials to put out on the Internet or publish somewhere and whether the expectation that those materials be free is fair or not. And there was a lot of great thought about that. I think like most people it's nice to have a mix of free and paid materials out there.

    But a lot of you raised the excellent point about materials you create at your job, and that binder in the teacher's room full of activities. I certainly wouldn't think teachers should charge money to collaborate in the staff room. And contributing to the teacher resource binder is a great way to help fellow teachers. I'll also say that sharing lessons with fellow teachers and seeing that they liked them was a big impetus for me to move to professional materials writing. I also hope that some of my past colleagues will or recommend my books, remembering what wonderful materials I shared with them.

    Just to play devil's advocate though, how would you feel if a fellow teacher at your school shared a bunch of excellent lessons. When you go back to ask for more, they say, "Well I have a collection of these kinds of lessons for sale for $10 on TeachersPayTeachers" Would you be offended? Would you buy it? Would you never speak to them again?

    Now back to reread this amazing discussion thread!




    ------------------------------
    Walton Burns
    Materials Writer
    ------------------------------



  • 17.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 17-01-2017 08:50 AM
    I believe that 'Caring and Sharing' is a principle on which teaching-learning operates. We care for our learners, therefore we share our knowledge and expertise with them. We try to make them better than us. When it comes to colleagues, though we care, sometimes we hesitate to share for fear of being excelled by others! But that is not being professional. We should know that we grow professionally only when we share. Some teachers are capable of producing materials while some others are not so adept. So it benefits them to borrow from others.  There should be a lot of 'give and take' in teaching profession. This can happen only when those who use your materials acknowledge and also get back to you with objective feedback. Feedback is essential for professional development . This can happen when we share.
    Jayashree Mohanraj

    ------------------------------
    Jayashree Mohanraj
    India
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  • 18.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 18-01-2017 09:21 AM

    I was actually recently contacted by the VIP Personnel to teach their students based in China.
    Reading your post --- I'm sort of glad now I didn't pursue the online teaching job.  I feel
    inadequate to teach children online for lack of experience --- I prefer teaching adult and
    has been teaching at their learning levels.  I don't remember discussing curriculum development
    with them.  

    --------
    MerriLee Leonard
    TESOL Educator
    Washington, D.C.
    --------- 

    ------------------------------
    MerriLee Leonard
    ESL Adult Students Instructor
    ------------------------------



  • 19.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 19-01-2017 10:42 AM
    Hello everyone,

    I think giving materials away and, feeling good or bad about it, relies heavily on your personal values. As I believe, it is not a matter of the money you spent in the creation of them, but the time you devoted to them. Time is precious to everyone and, we obviously want to spend our time on rewarding activities. Teaching itself is rewarding enough to make money be on a secondary position. So, the most important thing is time. This time being used for creating materials and selecting the best ones to she them in our classes. Both activities are consume lots of our time as creators, but save a lot to those who may use them. As we are teachers, we are supossed to act accordingly. Teachers are important and necessary in the society because we "give things away." Among these things we give away are our money, time and effort. So, let us continue creating materials and giving them away to whoever may need them. This behavior says a lot about our personal and professional values. This is my humble point of view.


    ------------------------------
    William Benjamin
    Professor of English
    Maritime University of the Caribbean
    Venezuela
    ------------------------------



  • 20.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 23-01-2017 08:41 AM
    This has been a very interesting conversation to follow! As someone who has benefitted a lot from freely shared (and freely sharing) resources, I understand the reluctance to pay for something that you could get for free. As someone who would like to branch out into publishing, I understand the desire to be paid for the work that you've put into developing useful resources. 
    There is a third option which I'd recommend looking into. It's called "pay what you want" pricing. If you sell from your own website it's possible to allow customers to pay what they think is fair or what they're able to pay for your products. 

    ------------------------------
    Wilma Luth
    ESL Instructor & Teacher Trainer
    Canada
    ------------------------------



  • 21.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 24-01-2017 08:27 AM
    Wilma - you raise a very good point about "pay what you can".  I recently saw this on a website for the first time a couple of weeks ago. Given that we can be connected to teachers everywhere, being mindful of the rates of pay for teachers around the world is a good idea.  I would like to try this on my website.  (A good example of access for all teachers is iTDI.pro. They offer PD training and have scholarships for teachers from certain countries.  The price of each regular course fee include funds that go towards scholarships to make sure that a teacher can participate despite their financial means).

    ------------------------------
    Patrice Palmer, M. Ed., M.A., TESL
    Canada
    ------------------------------



  • 22.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 25-01-2017 04:37 PM

    Hi Patrice - yes, iTDI is a great example of the "pay what you can" model of payment. Actually, it's about the only example I know of in the field of English language teaching. And really there should be more considering that, as you wrote, rates of pay vary so much around the world. If you want to read up on the idea of "pay what you can/want", much of what I know about it I've learned from Tom Morkes' website, tommorkes.com. If you do try it out, i'd love to know how it goes!



    ------------------------------
    Wilma Luth
    ESL Instructor & Teacher Trainer
    Ontario, Canada
    ------------------------------



  • 23.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 30-01-2017 04:20 PM

    I wonder if those who think materials are expensive and should therefore be free would be willing to give up their own teaching salaries to pay for the materials instead. I mean... I have as much right to earn a living as they do, right? ;)

    I've given my materials away free sometimes--for a limited time or to certain markets/audiences. As long as I control that, then it's my choice. When people steal my work by photocopying it or posting it online, it's no different from their taking my clothes or my food or the gas from my car. Or my car. Even if someone comes from a country that is not considered "rich," they don't have the right to steal my food. The money I get from selling books and working on paid materials is what buys my food. There is no other money... Some people create materials as a hobby. There are also volunteer teachers. I don't object to either of those. But the majority of teachers couldn't work without getting paid for their work; it's the same with materials writers.

    Those who struggle to afford materials for their classes can

    1) Create their own materials (i.e., pay in time and effort--since it certainly costs us time and effort to make materials)

    2) Look for cheaper alternatives. Since indie authors earn more per copy sold (by a significant amount) on self-published materials, they can afford to charge less. I earn more money on a .99 self-published ebook than I do on some of my books from major publishers that retail for $30-$50. And the number of indie authors and small presses is growing.

    3) Work to change the system. Don't expect publishers to give away workbooks, CDs, testing programs, videos, student websites, teacher websites, teacher training, conference parties, webinars, and so on, and still be able to keep student book prices low. A decade or two ago, publishers could afford to give away a few ancillaries because they didn't cost as much to create and there weren't as many of them. That somehow gave rise to the system of only the student book and perhaps the CDs and workbooks being sold, and a ton of stuff given free to teachers and students--though the publishers still have to pay (often a lot) to create those resources. I think we need a system where if you want something, you pay for it. If you can't afford it, then you don't buy it. That will ultimately bring prices back down. But... it will take some time.

    Dorothy



    ------------------------------
    Dorothy Zemach
    Editor/Writer/Author
    Wayzgoose, Inc.
    ------------------------------



  • 24.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 31-01-2017 08:55 AM
    I agree this is a problem.
    I had my developed oral English materials - nice graphics etc on a website.
    I closed it as the cost of hosting wasn't covered by sales revenue.
    When i used my materials in class I took the trouble to laminate them on coloured paper. apart from a bit of souveniring, they were virtually indestructible. The cost per student over 2 years of use was minuscule. Nevertheless very few were prepared to pay.

    ------------------------------
    Rob Harris
    Mr
    Personal
    New Zealand
    ------------------------------



  • 25.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 02-02-2017 08:20 AM
    Hi Rob,

    This is a great idea. Some universities allow printing on special type papers or posters for a decent price that both faculty and students have access to, as well. Thanks for that idea - which is great considering the contents of the thread. 


    ------------------------------
    Juliet Huynh
    UTA
    ------------------------------



  • 26.  RE: Sharing materials for free vs. demanding compensation for work

    Posted 03-02-2017 03:39 PM
    The employer acting as enabler, still doesn't get over the problem.
    If you want to work from home country and develop resources based on your experience i.e 'the retirement job' you are forced onto the web.
    I think that for China, which is the ESL location I'm most familiar with, teachers are low paid, filling in, backpacking etc and have no interest in improving their service to students.
    Love to be proved wrong, but unlikely.
    Best 
     

    ------------------------------
    Rob Harris
    Mr
    Personal
    New Zealand
    ------------------------------