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Self-introduction

  • 1.  Self-introduction

    Posted 4 days ago
    Hello everyone! I'm a new member!
    My name is Agustina. I'm an English teacher from Uruguay. I'm currently working in public and private institutes. I'm glad to be part of this wonderful community.
    Regards,
    Agustina.

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    Agustina De Los Santos
    Alianza San Ramon
    Uruguay
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  • 2.  RE: Self-introduction

    Posted 4 days ago
    Edited by Leila Serikova 4 days ago
    Hello Agustina!
    I'm Leila from Kyrgyzstan. Nice to meet you!
    I am an English teacher in private language school and at university, My students are teens and adults.
    You teach in both public and private institutes - who do you teach: kids, teens or adults? Are students and work conditions different in public and private institutes in Uruguay?


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    Leila Serikova
    International University in Central Asia (IUCA), Tokmok
    Kyrgyzstan
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  • 3.  RE: Self-introduction

    Posted 4 days ago
    Hi Leila! Nice to meet you too.
    My students are young learners, children and teenagers. However, I would like to highlight that at public highschools I only teach teens.
    Regarding the education system, in Uruguay between 80 and 90% of students of all ages attend public education. Private education represents no more than about 15% – a rate that has varied little historically. Public education is totally free, from preschool to university, including at the master's and doctoral levels. We might suppose that a system with these characteristics – public, free, and open, in a country with low population growth,but it does not.
    The main problem confronting the education system was the inadequacy of facilities, instructional materials, and teachers' aides. Rural areas often suffered from woefully insufficient facilities and supplies. Urban schools often were seriously overcrowded and were forced to resort to holding classes in multiple shifts. In addition, dropout and repetition rates, although moderate by Latin American standards, were still considered high. For this reason, private institutes obtain higher grades, they offer better oportunities.
    How is the education system in your country? I'm courious to know a little about it.
    Warm regards,
    Agustina.



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    Agustina De Los Santos
    Alianza San Ramon
    Uruguay
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  • 4.  RE: Self-introduction

    Posted 3 days ago
    Edited by Leila Serikova 3 days ago
    Thank you for responding me so quickly, Agustina.
    You are interested to know more about education in my country. I have to say there are some pluses and minuses in the education system of Kyrgyzstan.
    Kyrgyzstan faced a lot of problems after the Soviet period collapse and we are still on the way to develop the education system of our country. Not everything works well. Some institutes (state ones) are based more on 'old' traditional methods that are close to the Soviet Union education system. Realizing that today we need to use new approches that will help our students to meet their needs and desire to study differently, we have a big number of private education institutes (preschool centres, kindergartens, schools, lyceums and universities) that have foreign countries' system of education.
    For example, I work at private university that was created according to the American model of higher education. Our students have an opportunity to graduate with two university diplomas: local diploma and American that can help them to study abroad. Our university is very young (only 12 years old), quite small (with 150 students) and is located not in the capital but in the town of Tokmok (60 km far from the capital, Bishkek city). One  of the main principles of the university is  academic honesty. And it is something we really value today because a lot of corruption happens in all sphere of the country.
    A good thing is that our students have a choice to study and get knowledge at a proper way without corruption. However, there is another side of the medal - it is quite expensive for most of population of our developing country. And not every family with more than 4 children in regions can afford studying in private institutes. That is why our university offers a financial support for some of our students however there are still a lot of young people who study in institutes that do not provide a good level of education because of financial problems our people have. So, most of children go to crowded state kindersgartens or study in state schools with 40 students in one class and than they enter universities that do not answer their needs and interests.
    I hope we will change for better in the future and education system of our country will work on principles of honesty that will support young people to develop their country. I believe that teachers will work in order not  earn their living but because they will have a desire, time and opportunity to help their students. In spite of all the difficulties we have in our country, there are a lot of teachers who teach because they love it and they do their best to develop their teaching skills. I really respect teachers who work at our state schools and who believe in their stydents' success and really help their learners to be good and useful; especially those who work long hours every day with big numbers of students in their classes, who really help children to achieve good results.

    Agustina, I hope you are not disappointed and that you are still interested in my country.)))

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    Leila Serikova
    International University in Central Asia (IUCA), Tokmok
    Kyrgyzstan
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