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Posting Materials

  • 1.  Posting Materials

    Posted 22-04-2020 11:34
    TESOL Friends,
      I have just finished a zoom workshop on writing a thesis (drawing heavily from Swales & Feak, Hyland, Paltridge, Tardy) and would be willing to share the PP.  However, I wonder about breaking copyright rules since I have quoted the experts liberally.  Thoughts on this?

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    Ann Johns
    Professor Emerita
    San Diego State University
    United States
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  • 2.  RE: Posting Materials

    Posted 22-04-2020 15:27

    Dear Dr. Johns,

    I hope you are doing well.

    This workshop sounds really wonderful and I would love to see it once you have a resolution about the copyright issues.

    Many thanks in advance.

    Kind regards,

    Jennifer



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    Jennifer Vann
    University of Florida
    United States
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  • 3.  RE: Posting Materials

    Posted 23-04-2020 05:12
    In the United States, you should be covered by the fiar use provisions
    in the Constitution that allow for the sitribution of materials for educational purposes. Fair use, however, is like a rubric that teachers use for grading papers; it is explanatory rather than a law. The key provision here is commercial use, which means that you are not benefiting commercially from the distribution, and the publisher, not losing revenue because it is impacting negatively the sales of the book. However, as my wife was taught the first day of paralegal shool, "anybody can sue anybody for anything."

    A student came to me yesterday with a similar question about sharing an algorithm that may contain code from another source. The other question this raises is where he created the algorithm using university time and property but as a student, he is normally exempt from work for hire provisions. If you created the presentation using a university computer, the university could claim that they owned the presentation although most universities exempt the faculty unless the property will make them a lot of money. You might go to the Creative Commons website to get a NC (non-commercial) license, although I have never been sure what that does.
    I am not a lawyer (nor do I play one on television) but retired and soon to be an unemployed English teacher. I do want to pub in a shameless plug for my  book, Plagiarism, Intellectual Property and the Teaching of L2 Writing, which may be out of print.
    -- 
    Joel Bloch
     

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