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Changing our mindset to successful online teaching

  • 1.  Changing our mindset to successful online teaching

    Posted 26-05-2020 09:33

    Hello everyone:

    In the past few weeks, COVID-19 has gone global affecting all countries, societies, and health systems. It is disrupting all aspects of our social, political, or economic lives. The latter being economic, it means that our jobs have also suffered the impact. The amount of hours, frequency, the way of teaching (in person), and the resources we used, are not the same anymore. The lockdown to avoid getting infected has forced us to move and learn new teaching tools: virtual ones. Changing our mindset to successful online teaching is a long-term process and our will and decision is playing a crucial role in changing our mindset. We must learn virtual teaching tools. In your experience teaching online since the beginning of the Peruvian lockdown, what practices, new things have you discovered and put in practice in your online session? Would you like to share some to our beloved  ICPNA members?

    Efrain Punto



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    Efraín Arturo Punto Noriega
    Peru
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  • 2.  RE: Changing our mindset to successful online teaching

    Posted 03-06-2020 10:13
    Hello, Efrain!

    Poland here, but what we've been hearing from language teachers is that some learners may have no or insufficient access to technology (own computer, one powerful enough for the software, a good data plan) - though sometimes this may not be the worst; in the European countries I know the stats affecting around 10% of higher education students. Another observation is that some teachers prefer their students to keep the mikes on to avoid the feeling of "talking to a brick wall". And that enabling the option of private messaging may activate hitherto passive students.

    Cheers,

    -Mike

    P.S.

    We are currently running research investigating how language teachers have been coping with the transition to 𝐫𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧. The survey is anonymous and will solely serve scientific purposes. It should take around 25-38 minutes to complete; around 85% of the questions are of the quick multiple-choice type.
    The survey is available at https://www.surveygizmo.eu/s3/90232548/language-teachers

    I am aware of survey fatigue among the community, but hope our questionnaire is a bit different from others out there. Here are some respondents' comments:
    "Thank you for sharing this survey! I enjoyed completing it, and thought it was one of the more comprehensive and compassionate surveys I've done during this time."
    "Just completed this survey and I too would HIGHLY recommend that you spend some time completing it. It's LONG as surveys go, so grab yourself a good cup of tea/coffee and some nibbles and find yourself a quiet space, it's going take over half an hour, but I can safely say I have never felt that a survey could be life affirming but this is! It actually made me feel better. It's like your own personal therapist at these difficult times. Thank you! Well done."

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    Poland
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  • 3.  RE: Changing our mindset to successful online teaching

    Posted 04-06-2020 02:38
    Thanks so much for great discussion. Here in Saudi Arabia, online teaching has been seen with great skeptism. In fact, in hiring new professors, we have to "prove" that the M.A. or Ph.D. courses that they took were not conducted on-line. As a result, when we were suddenly "thrown" into online classes because of COVID-19, we had to make substantial changes to our teaching approach. Working at an expensive, private, English-medium university, we expected our students from well-off backgrounds to have access to the newest, best, most expensive technology. Oddly, many of our students have limited access to a computer. Rather they use their (newest, best, most expensive) mobile phones for almost all their work and might borrow use their mother's laptop when absolutely essential, such as  for the unified, onsite, online exams we began giving even before COVID-19. It was an example of the dangers of the presupposition that "everyone" has computers.

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    Charles Hall, Ph.D., dr.h.c
    Legal English, Teaching Training
    International Summer Language School -- TEFL Cert.
    https://isls.zcu.cz/english-isls-2018/?lang=en
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