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21st Centruy Skills info?

  • 1.  21st Centruy Skills info?

    Posted 22-10-2019 08:40
    Edited by Freddy Arturo Anchelia Riveros 25-10-2019 08:37
    Dear all,

    Next month, I am giving a presentation on 21st Century Skills in Class, and I was wondering if you could give me a hand.
    I have already done some research and browsed many websites, but if you could suggest some, I would be more than delighted.

    Best regards,

    ------------------------------
    Freddy Arturo Anchelia Riveros
    Peru
    ------------------------------


  • 2.  RE: 21st Centruy Skills info?

    Posted 23-10-2019 01:53

    The Most Important Skill in the 21st Century

    Something strange happened with the birth of the internet; something changed about how we understand our identity and our existence. And that something was that our sense of self got translated into 0s and 1s so that we could project a part of our being as a single node into a global network of nodes made up of other selves.

    In a way, this is no different from how we interact with our more local cultures, whether they be our families, our communities, our corporations, or our nations. All of these entities are cultures of interconnected selves in a network that changes and evolves relative to the thoughts, the emotions, and the behaviors of the individuals that make up the collective. The culture influences us just as we influence the culture.

    The way that the internet is different, however, is the speed and the scale of the network. Things move quicker in the digital world, and on top of that, it is - as the late media theorist Marshall McLuhan put it - a global village. The reach of this network extends to each and every corner of the world rather than just the bubbles that physically surround us in the day-to-day world of atoms. Like with most great technologies, these facts have combined to augment both the best and the worst of humanity. The core that builds out this augmentation, however, is this: We are now crowded by more information than we have ever previously had to make sense of.

    Growing up in a generation even as recent as the mid-20th century meant that your sense of self was mostly shaped by a combination of your local cultures, popular media culture, your education, and whatever life experiences you accumulated living in the real world. Today, however, things are slightly different. The internet has not only completely shattered and broken what we think of as popular culture into million little pieces, incapable of making a coherent whole, but it has also equipped us with all of humanity's knowledge. Now, access to the diversity of information and cultures and knowledge can lead to power, but too much information and too many cultures and too much knowledge only overwhelm, and given how the human mind works, leading us to confusion. As the late psychotherapist Carl Jung put it:

    "The pendulum of the mind oscillates between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong. The numinosum is dangerous because it lures men to extremes, so that a modest truth is regarded as the truth and a minor mistake is equated with fatal error."

    Our mind has filters to deal with information overload, breaking things down and making them simpler for us to consume, but as Jung insinuated, these filters aren't necessarily the paragons of rationality. They don't filter between what is objectively right or objectively wrong, but rather, they filter how well the information coheres with our existing state of mind, our existing sense of self, to maintain its sanity in a world far more complex than it could wish to comprehend in a limited amount of time.

    In the past, growing up in local cultures in the physical world, we had these same filters in place, of course, but we also had more time and less information. Your parents may have conditioned you one way, your teachers another, and your friends, too, but there was a limit to how much they could communicate with you. This meant that you had both the time and the space to think, and if the conditioning wasn't useful, your sense of self would eventually be aware enough to have an easier time rejecting it, even if you filtered for coherence and short-term sanity in the beginning.

    In the global village created by the internet, on the other hand, the node of your digital self is constantly bombarded by the larger network, which is itself shaped by hidden algorithms, mostly manipulated by those who happen to shout the loudest. For the average person, the amount of consumption far exceeds the amount of time they have to rationally make sense of it. And when they can't rationally make sense of it, they take shortcuts, which is clearly apparent in the rampant and blind tribalism on most social media networks. And, of course, those who refuse to take shortcuts often get punished for this by a state of constant and bewildering confusion they feel regarding their place in all of this.

    The internet is still young, and it is still learning to organize itself. But until it does, the most important skill in the 21st century will be the ability to rationally refine the sense-making apparatus of our mind. Rather than blindly following the automatic filters and biases of the brain, it will be to create our own information filters. Rather than simply being a node in the grand network, it will be to see the network as a whole as it continues to evolve. Rather than pretending that the information we consume has already been filtered for right and wrong just because our own sense of self has an attachment to a particular tribe or an idea that makes us feel emotionally secure, it will be to ask why that information might be right or wrong from someone else's point of view.

    At its core, this kind of sense-making has two components: The first is to do the work to figure out which information should be consumed and which should be discarded - consciously, beyond our personal biases, and ideally, from as many diverse perspectives as possible; the second is to just step away from it all to simply think about what is consumed and how it all connects.

    The American philosopher Ken Wilber likes to assert that everybody has some important piece of the truth. This applies to people, as well as to ideas. And yes, while the words of, say, a racist might make objectively false language claims, the emotional experience that underlies those claims has a sliver of truth because it explains their complex relationship to reality, however misguided their words and any subsequent actions may be, or however uncomfortable that may make us. And if you take a hundred or a thousand different little truths, dig a little deeper into each of them rather than blindly dismissing whatever threatens your attachment to your own sense of self, what you end up with is a mosaic of interrelated experiences that collectively guide the global culture. A network of truths unveils itself rather than whatever truth is most comforting to you.

    In the modern world, we have far more information than we know what to do with. It's perhaps far more than we could wish to reasonably make sense of no matter how many filters we intentionally create, no matter how long we step away to think about our consumption. That said, this simple fact is a gift or a curse relative to what we do about it. If we take the easy way out, which is the way of blind association to whatever part of the network it is that conditions our own personal node, then we all suffer. If, however, we are more intentional in how we choose to interact with this information, we can start to put together enough pieces of the puzzle to at least peek at some important parts of the picture without even having to fully complete it.

    The most effective people learn to close the gap between what makes sense and what is right. What makes sense is what is coherent only if you ignore anything that doesn't suit your existing narrative. Rightness, on the other hand, is the willingness to embrace temporary incoherence - or a state of confusion and nonsense - long enough that a broader and more honest mental model of the world can be created. One accepts only what makes it feel comfortable; the other seeks out and corrects errors to make itself better aligned with the actual workings of reality.

    The scope of our sense-making apparatus has grown from local to global within a generation. Not only is there more daily pressure applied to it, but the amount of time it has to respond to these challenges is getting shorter. What matters isn't what we consume, but how the grand total of our consumption is made sense of, and increasingly, in this latter regard, we are fighting an uphill battle that is edging us towards an unconscious perception of reality rather than a truthful one.

    If we don't effectively use our tools, our tools end up using us. In the 21st century, the difference will be determined by how we manage information.







  • 3.  RE: 21st Centruy Skills info?

    Posted 23-10-2019 08:17
    Thanks for such valuable contribution. :)

    Regards,

    ------------------------------
    Freddy Arturo Anchelia Riveros
    Peru
    ------------------------------



  • 4.  RE: 21st Centruy Skills info?

    Posted 24-10-2019 03:30

    Thanks for such a super thread. I've written and spoken many times about a major  "myth-understanding" about what globalization means. Globalization has NOT created, as McLuhan said, the "global village." Rather, it has created the "global city."

    A village is a small homogenous group of people who share a common culture, common beliefs and expectations [also known as typical high context cultures]. In a village, everyone knows exactly what their neighbors are doing and even what they've having for dinner on any given day… older Americans from the Northeast might even remember the advertising slogan, "Wednesday is PRINCE spaghetti day."  

    But in the modern global city, we don't know who lives next door either IRL or virtually. Walking down the street of the virtual or physical global city, we don't know what will be around the corner… a new Ethiopian restaurant (yeah!!!) or a neo-nazi recruiting station (yeck…), both are just as likely.

    So we need to dump the "myth-understanding" of the global village that will never exist -- except in the hive minds of science fiction – and embrace the exhilarating but challenging global city.

    Our job then in the 21st century is to help our students be active citizens of the global city, where diversity and ambiguity are not only present but celebrated.



    ------------------------------
    Charles Hall, Ph.D., dr.h.c
    Legal English, Teaching Training
    International Summer Language School -- TEFL Cert.
    https://isls.zcu.cz/english-isls-2018/?lang=en
    ------------------------------



  • 5.  RE: 21st Centruy Skills info?

    Posted 24-10-2019 08:10
    Dear Charles,

    I couldn't agree more with you. It is true; we, as teachers, need to guide students to connet with this "Global Village" by developing their called 21st century skills.

    ------------------------------
    Freddy Arturo Anchelia Riveros
    Peru
    ------------------------------



  • 6.  RE: 21st Centruy Skills info?

    Posted 24-10-2019 09:22
    An interesting essay that is also related:
    http://digitalsandbox.weebly.com/uploads/5/5/8/8/5588196/campfires.pdf

    ------------------------------
    Janine Carlock
    Assistant Professor
    Duquesne University, ESL Programs
    Pittsburgh, PA
    ------------------------------



  • 7.  RE: 21st Centruy Skills info?

    Posted 25-10-2019 08:29
    Dear Janine,

    Thanks for sharing it.

    Regards,

    ------------------------------
    Freddy Arturo Anchelia Riveros
    Peru
    ------------------------------



  • 8.  RE: 21st Centruy Skills info?

    Posted 25-10-2019 04:04

    Dear all,

    What an interesting thread and so relevant too.

    At Oxford Univ Press ELT, we've just released a position paper on Global Skills (aka 21st century skills) which captures the skills and the need for those skills to be overtly taught in the classroom.

    You can access the paper here: www.oup.com/elt/expert

    It's Global Skills: Creating empowered 21st century learners.

    Happy reading and hope the presentation goes well.

    Best,

    Yordanka

     

    Yordanka Kavalova

    Publisher, ELT Professional Development

    Oxford University Press

    Great Clarendon Street, Oxford, OX2 6DP
    Tel: +44 (0)1865 354587

    Mob: + 44 (0) 7775 020903

     

     


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  • 9.  RE: 21st Centruy Skills info?

    Posted 25-10-2019 08:30
    Dear Yordanka,

    Thanks for your contribution.

    Regards,

    ------------------------------
    Freddy Arturo Anchelia Riveros
    Peru
    ------------------------------



  • 10.  RE: 21st Centruy Skills info?

    Posted 24-10-2019 14:22
      |   view attached
    Hello,

    In 2018 the Royal Bank of Canada (RBC) published the attached document.  In order to produce the document, they conducted a year long research project that involved consultations with students, workers in a wide range of careers, educators at the secondary and post-secondary levels, as well as governmental policy makers.  It provides a decidedly Canadian perspective, but many of the findings will translate across national boundaries.  I hope you find it informative.

    Another significant area of importance for 21st century skills is Intercultural Competence.  This is a long-standing area of research and inquiry, and should certainly be addressed in any overview of 21st century skills.  The work of Geert Hofestede and Darla Deardorff are excellent places to start.

    Best regards,

    ------------------------------
    Matt Hildebrand
    Curriculum Support Instructor
    University of Manitoba, English Language Centre
    Canada
    ------------------------------

    Attachment(s)



  • 11.  RE: 21st Centruy Skills info?

    Posted 25-10-2019 08:34
    Dear Matt,

    Thanks for sharing it.

    Regards,

    ------------------------------
    Freddy Arturo Anchelia Riveros
    Peru
    ------------------------------



  • 12.  RE: 21st Centruy Skills info?

    Posted 23-10-2019 07:40
      |   view attached
    Hi Freddy.  I'm not sure if this is exactly what you're looking for, but I found this in doing my own research:

    Pellegrino, J.W., & Hilton, M.L. (2012). Education for Life and Work: Developing Transferable Knowledge and Skills in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. Retrieved from: https://www.nap.edu/download/13398

    It's an excellent source about what to consider when teaching for effective learning.

    This one is also good:

    Fink, L. D. (2013). Creating significant learning experiences: An integrated approach to designing college courses. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    Good luck!

    Janine



    ------------------------------
    Janine Carlock
    Assistant Professor
    Duquesne University, ESL Programs
    Pittsburgh, PA
    ------------------------------



  • 13.  RE: 21st Centruy Skills info?

    Posted 23-10-2019 08:17
    Thanks a lot for your cooperation.

    Regards,

    ------------------------------
    Freddy Arturo Anchelia Riveros
    Peru
    ------------------------------



  • 14.  RE: 21st Centruy Skills info?

    Posted 23-10-2019 13:38
    Dear Freddy,

    Please feel free to take a look at Actionthroughwords, an online class for English language learning whose content is about the work done by the UN for peace and wellness around the world.
    The PI is Patricia Duffy from the UN Language Programme and I had the honor of acting as a consultant. It is also being currently used on an experimental basis by emergent bilingual high school students in New York City and is in the process of being revised.

    Check the followiing article for some initial data on that project.
    Eisenstein Ebsworth, M., Cai, C. & McCoy, L. (2019). Adolescent ELLs Improve their Academic English while Learning about the UN Online.  languages-418284; doi: 10.3390/languages4010009

    Good luck with your presentation!


    ------------------------------
    Miriam Ebsworth
    New York University
    ------------------------------



  • 15.  RE: 21st Centruy Skills info?

    Posted 23-10-2019 16:27
    Dear Miriam,

    Thanks for your support!

    Warm regards,

    ------------------------------
    Freddy Arturo Anchelia Riveros
    Peru
    ------------------------------



  • 16.  RE: 21st Centruy Skills info?

    Posted 25-10-2019 08:26
    In addition to the amazing resources shared by others here, I was working on designing an ICC course recently and came across this interesting paper on ICC with some insights on it being a key cirrciulum compoennet in the 21st century class.
    Here's the link http://journals.castledown-publishers.com/index.php/ice/article/view/87/24

    Best of luck with your presentation!

    ------------------------------
    Amira Salama
    Academic Writing Instructor & Teacher Trainer
    Cairo, Egypt
    ------------------------------



  • 17.  RE: 21st Centruy Skills info?

    Posted 25-10-2019 08:34
    Thanks, Amira.

    Regards,

    ------------------------------
    Freddy Arturo Anchelia Riveros
    Peru
    ------------------------------